Bioelectronics Group
Professor Polina Anikeeva

People

Polina Anikeeva

Department of Materials Science and Engineering and
the Research Laboratory of Electronics

My goal is to combine the current knowledge of biology and nanoelectronics to develop materials and devices for minimally invasive treatments for neurological and neuromuscular diseases.

When I am not in the office or lab you can find me training for a marathon or working towards my next climbing grade.

Publications by Polina Anikeeva

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Administrative Assistant

Ayn Inserto

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PostDocs

Elizabeth Canovic

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I completed my Ph.D in biomedical engineering at Boston University, where I studied multiscale cell mechanics and traction force regulation. I then worked as a postdoc in Krystyn Van Vliet's lab examining the mechanical properties of cells and brain tissue in a mouse model of autism. In 2015, I joined the Bioelectronic Group, where I am currently exploring the tissue-materials interactions in the brain and how to optimize neural probe design to minimize the brain's inflammatory response to chronically implanted devices. I am also interested in designing scaffolds for nerve regneration that use a combination of physical and biochemical cues to guide axon growth.


Outside of the lab, I enjoy spending time with my family, traveling, and hiking.

Mehmet Kanik

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I received my PhD degree in Materials Science and Nanotechnology at Bilkent University. In my thesis, which was titled as “Nanostructured Materials and Devices For Energy Harvesting and Sensing Applications”, I developed a new phase change mechanism of polymer piezoelectric materials, which can drastically enhance performance of such materials. I showed proof of principle, high-performance, triboelectric and piezoelectric nanoelectronic devices such as artificial skin, nano-energy-generators, chemical sensors, anthropometric artificial hand, electro-cardiac sensors. In addition to those studies mentioned above, I contributed several researches related to development of photonic band gap fibers, photoconductive nanowires, chalcogenide micro-cavity resonator arrays, conductive composite nanostructures, fiber based microfluidic channels, artificial nose and core-shell nanostructures. I joined the Bioelectronics Group in 2015 and focused on diverse subjects such as neurophysiological and neuromuscular interfaces, opto-genetics and mimicking neural activities such as action potential.

When I am not in the lab, I enjoy traveling, practicing martial arts or sparring.

Siyuan Rao

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I received my PhD degree in Materials Physics and Chemistry at Beihang University in China in 2015. In my PhD career, my research focused on energy conversion devices, such as rhodopsin-based photoelectric cells, direct methanol fuel cells. We established several rhodopsin-based light-powering devices, like a nanochannel-modulated biocapacitor, a biosensor for pH detection. Also, I learned nanoparticles superlattice fabrication when I was a short-term visiting scholar in Monash University in Australia. In the early 2016, I joined the Bioelectronic Group at MIT. Here I am exploring the molecular mechanism of biological magnetosensation and trying to realize it in mammalian system.

Although I enjoy the time playing with chemicals or cells in the lab, I spare some time on improving my cooking skills, raising tropical fish and growing flowers.

Dekel Rosenfeld

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I completed my PhD at the Technion, where I studied the influence of mechanical forces on cells within 3D polymeric scaffolds. I than continue to work in the Technion in Prof. Levenberg lab on microfluidics and nano-droplet arrays. In January 2016, I joined the Bioelectronic Group, where I will be working on deep tissue stimulation using magnetic nano-particles and designing scaffolds for promoting nerve growth and stimulation.

Outside the lab I enjoy cooking, travelling and spending time with my family.

Danijela Gregurec

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I completed my PhD at CIC biomaGUNE, Spain in the group of Sergio Moya where I worked on the design of bio/inorganic interfaces of implant materials for enhancing their biological performance. Work was based on metal and oxide surface functionalization with natural and synthetic polymers and surface doping with bioactive molecules. I joined the Bioelectronics Group in 2016 to work on the development of noninvasive magnetic nanoparticle-based sensors for stimulation and imaging of the central nervous system.

Besides my research activities, I enjoy cooking and painting.

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Graduate Students

Andres Canales

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I joined the lab in october of 2011 as a Masters Student in Materials Science and Engineering. I have now been admitted into the PhD program and I am hoping to continue my research on high-resolution neural recording devices. Before coming to MIT I was a chemistry student in the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), where I worked on materials synthesis.

When I am not doing fabrication you can find me running numerous circles around Chestnut Hill Reservoir.

Ritchie Chen

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I joined the Bioelectronics group in the fall of 2011 as a Ph.D. candidate in Materials Science and Engineering.  I received a B.S in both Bioengineering and Materials Science from U.C Berkeley in the summer of 2010.  At Berkeley, I worked under Dr. Ronald Zuckermann at the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs studying the self-assembly of a novel class of biomimetic polymers called peptoids.  Here at MIT, I am developing photoelectrochemical cells based on protein building blocks as well as nanomaterials for the remote control of cellular behavior with the support of a NSF graduate fellowship.

Even though you can find me in the lab at any hour of the day, I find time to swim with the masters team.

Publications by Ritchie Chen

Michael Christiansen

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I joined the group in September 2012 after completing a B.S. in physics at Arizona State University and beginning graduate study in MIT's Department of Materials Science and Engineering. My previous research experiences have included internships focused on a variety of topics, including mammalian paleontology, concentrating solar power, capacitive deionization, and plasmonically enhanced nanostructured materials for communications applications. The project on which I'm currently working uses physical phenomena in inorganic materials to couple biological and electronic systems, an endeavor at a conceptual intersection of physics, biology, and chemistry.

In addition to academic activities, I enjoy backpacking and fly fishing with my friends.

Chi (Alice) Lu

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I am a PhD student in Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Program in Polymer Science and Technology (PPST). Before I joined the lab I was a student in University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where I worked with Prof. John Rogers on flexible electronic devices. I am currently interested in integrating highly flexible materials and electronics to develop devices for neural recording and stimulation.

When I am not dreaming about flexible materials I fabricate elaborate cakes and do yoga.

Publications by Chi Lu

Seongjun Park

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science


I joined the Bioelectronics group in September 2013 after finishing a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering at Seoul National University. My previous research was about fabricating micro/nano structures and microfluidic systems for stem cell and tissue culture. Now, I'm doing a project about developing a new concept of microscale polymer scaffold for neuroregeneration combined with optogenetic techniques.

When I don't spend my time with neurons, I usually play a piano or enjoy backpacking.

Alexander Senko

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

I joined the Bioelectronics group in October 2013 after completing a B.S. in materials science and engineering at Cornell University. My undergraduate research was conducted mainly in the fab at the Cornell Nanoscale Facility producing and characterizing magnetic thin film materials, and later developing novel MEMS devices for scanned probe microscopy. Here at MIT, I spend most of my time synthesizing magnetic nanoparticles and thinking about how they could be used to excite neurons with stimuli other than heat.

When I can make it out of Boston I enjoy skiing and hiking. My favorite outdoor activity in the city is sailing on the Charles River.

Junsang Moon

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

 

I joined the Bioelectronics group in October 2015 after completing a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering at Seoul National University. My previous research was mainly focused on developing catalysts for energy harvesting through water splitting. Here at Bioelectronics group, I’m trying to find new applications of magnetic nanoparticles and their assemblies to excite neurons.

When I am not in the lab, I usually enjoy playing sports or cooking.

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Undergraduate Students

Francisco Garcia

Department of Materials Science and Engineering


I joined the Bioelectronics Group in September 2014 as a sophomore undergraduate in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering and Chemistry. Here, I work with the magnetic nanoparticles subgroup for non-invasive deep brain stimulation. My current work has involved surface functionalization chemistry of nanoparticles for drug release to stimulate hippocampal neurons.


Outside research and coursework I am an avid dancer in the Boston area and with groups on MIT campus.

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Alumni

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