News: Research Highlights

Mon April 22, 2019

Near Unitary Squeezing

A group at the MIT led by Prof. Vladan Vuletić has recently generated significant amount of spin squeezing-a type of quantum entanglement-in an ultracold vapor of ytterbium-171. Spin squeezed states (SSS) can be used to overcome the standard quantum limit (SQL) which bounds state-of-the-art atomic sensors like optical clocks. The latter deploy a dilute vapor...
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Mon April 22, 2019

Direct Laser Cooling Rubidium Atoms

A group at MIT led by Vladan Vuletic has recently created a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) of rubidium atoms with a new method, direct laser cooling. Many researchers have attempted this elusive goal in the past, but due to various complications resorted to reaching BEC through evaporation instead. Compared to cooling through evaporation, laser cooling is...
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Tue April 2, 2019

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields

MIT researchers find a new way to make nanoscale measurements of fields, including information about their direction.

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Wed October 17, 2018

Improved Measurement of the Electron’s Electric Dipole Moment

Although the Standard Model of particle physics, one of the triumphs of modern physics, accurately describes all particle physics measurements made in laboratories so far, it is unable to answer many questions that arise from cosmological observations, such as the long-standing puzzle of why matter dominates over antimatter throughout the observable universe. To explain these...
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Tue September 25, 2018

Honing quantum sensing

PhD student David Layden in the Quantum Engineering Group has a new approach to spatial noise filtering that boosts development of ultra-sensitive quantum sensors. New research from MIT’s interdisciplinary Quantum Engineering Group (QEG) is addressing one of the fundamental challenges facing these quantum sensor systems: removing environmental noise from the signal being measured. “The usual...
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Sat September 1, 2018

Laser-cooling and Optical Trapping of Diatomic Molecules

Ultracold molecules have been proposed as a rich resource for many applications ranging from precision measurements and quantum metrology to quantum simulation and quantum information processing. The benefits of molecules in all these applications arise from the many internal degrees of freedom in a molecule. For example, even with the simplest two-atom diatomic molecules, one...
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Thu March 8, 2018

Scientists gain new visibility into quantum information transfer

Advance holds promise for “wiring” of quantum computers and other systems, and opens new avenues for understanding basic workings of the quantum realm.

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Thu February 22, 2018

Triatomic Molecules

In the simplest molecues, diatomic molecules made form two atoms, the vibration and rotation degrees of freedom gives rise to new features such as strong long-range dipolar interactions between molecules, a key ingredient in many quantum simulation and quantum computing proposals. Polyatomic molecules are an exciting new research frontier, as these molecules offer an even...
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Thu August 10, 2017

Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computing

Researchers have taken an important step toward the long-sought goal of a quantum computer, which in theory should be capable of vastly faster computations than conventional computers, for certain kinds of problems. The new work shows that collections of ultracold molecules can retain the information stored in them, for hundreds of times longer than researchers have previously achieved in these materials.

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