People: Dirk Englund

Postdoctoral Fellow

Biography:

Dirk Englund received his B.S. degree in Physics from Caltech in 2002. Following a year at the Technical University of Eindhoven, where he studied spintronics as a Fulbright Scholar, he proceeded to Stanford University to complete an M.S. in Electrical Engineering and a Ph.D. in Applied Physics in 2008. After postdoctoral work in Electrical Engineering at Stanford, he began a postdoctoral position with Professors Mikhail Lukin and Hongkun Park at Harvard University in 2009. His research focuses on applications of nanoscale physics and quantum optics in photonic crystals. He has co-authored over 25 journal articles and several book chapters.

Publications
  1. A. Sipahigil, R. Evans, D. Sukachev, C. Nguyen, M. Lukin, D. Englund, T. Schroder, M.E. Trusheim, M. Walsh, L. Li, J. Zheng, M. Scjukraft, J.L. Pacheco, R. Camacho, and E.S. Bielejec. Scalable Focused Ion Beam Creation of Nearly Lifetime-Limited Single Quantum Emitters in Diamond Nanostructures. Nature Communications, 8, May 2017.
  2. D. Englund, B. Shields, H. Park, M. Lukin, Kelley Rivoire, Fariba Hatami, and Jelena Vuckovic. A Scanning Cavity Nanoscope. submitted to Nano Letters 2010.
  3. D. Englund, B. Shields, H. Park, M. Lukin, Kelley Rivoire, Fariba Hatami, and Jelena Vuckovic. A Scanning Cavity Nanoscope. Submitted 2010 2010.
Past Events
Tue February 7, 2017 4:00 pm

Semiconductor Quantum Technologies for Communications and Computing

Location:MIT 4-270

The field of quantum optics offers new ways to compute, communicate, and measure with quantum states. Recent advances in materials, quantum control, and nanofabrication now open the prospect for scalable quantum technologies based on solid-state quantum systems. In particular, photonic integrated circuits (PICs) now allow routing photons with high precision and low loss, and atom-like systems in semiconductors enable spin-based quantum memories that can be coupled to these optical circuits. The first part of this talk will review our recent progress in adapting one of the leading PIC architectures—silicon photonics—for various quantum secure communications protocols. The second part of the talk will consider how PIC technology, integrated with quantum memories, can extend the reach of quantum communications and form the basis of modular quantum computers.

Event type: