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Collin Stultz
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Collin M. Stultz

W. M. Keck Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
Associate Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology
MIT's Collin Stultz: W. M. Keck Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS). Associate Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Room 36-796
Cambridge, MA 02139
cmstultz@mit.edu
617.253.4961—Tel

Administrative Assistant

Arlene Wint
aewint@mit.edu
617.324.4349—Tel
Room 36-776

Professor Collin M. Stultz is a principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Professor Stultz conducts research to understand conformational changes in macromolecules and the effect of structural transitions on common human diseases. His research group employs an interdisciplinary approach that utilizes techniques drawn from computational chemistry, signal processing, and basic biochemistry.

Professor Stutlz received the AB from Harvard College in 1988, and the MD from Harvard Medical School as well as the PhD in Biophysics from MIT in 1997. An alumnus of the Harvard-MIT program in Health Sciences and Technology (HST), Professor Stultz is on the faculty of both HST and MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is a member of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Among his honors are being a recipient of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award in Biomedical Sciences and the James Tolbert Shipley Prize.

Keywords

molecular simulations, protein structure and dynamics, biophysics, disease models, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, stochastic models, function optimization
molecular simulations, protein structure and dynamics, biophysics, disease models, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, stochastic models, function optimization

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