MIT
Quantum Nanostructures and
Nanofabrication Group

Prof. Karl K. Berggren

People

Current Group Members

Professor Karl K. Berggren

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar Street, Suite 36-219
Cambridge, MA 02139

617.324.0272—Tel / 617.253.8509—Fax / 617.253.7545—Asst
berggren@mit.edu / RLE Biography / RLE Video

Prof. Berggren is Professor of Electrical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, where he heads the Quantum Nanostructures and Nanofabrication Group. He is also Director of the Nanostructures Laboratory in the Research Laboratory of Electronics and is a core faculty member in the Microsystems Technology Laboratory (MTL). From December of 1996 to September of 2003, Prof. Berggren served as a staff member at MIT Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, Massachusetts, and from 2010 to 2011, was on sabbatical at the Technical University of Delft in the Netherlands.

His current research focuses on methods of nanofabrication, especially applied to superconductive circuits, single-photon detectors for quantum applications, and electron-optical systems. His thesis work focused on nanolithographic methods using neutral atoms.

Professor Berggren has taught several classes at MIT, including 6.02 Digital Communications, 6 .002, Circuits and Electronics, and 6.728, Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics, and 6.781, Submicrometer and Nanometer Technology.

Prof. Berggren is a fellow of AAAS, fellow of IEEE and a fellow of the International Society for Nanomanufacturing. He is a Kavli fellow, and a recipient of the 2015 Paul T. Forman Team Engineering Award from the Optical Society of America. In 2016, he received a Bose Fellowship and was also a recipient of the EECS Department's Frank Quick Innovation Fellowship.

He is currently the section editor for patterning and nanofabrication of the IOP Nanotechnology journal, and also serves on the editorial board of the IOP Nano Futures journal.   He was the program chair of the 2014 Electron, Ion, Photon Beams and Nanofabrication Conference. From 2008 to 2014 he was an elected member of the board of the Applied Superconductivity Conference.

Prof. Berggren has served as a consultant to a number of industrial, academic, and government organizations, and continues an active independent consulting practice.

 

Navid Abedzadeh

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-279
Cambridge, MA 02139

navid@mit.edu

Navid Abedzadeh is a graduate student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He received his B.ASc in Nanotechnology Engineering from the University of Waterloo, Canada, in 2015. His research prior to joining MIT focused on nanophotonics and the design of optically tunable plasmonic nano-gratings. Navid is currently involved in the study of the quantum electron microscope for applications in interaction-free measurements. He spends his free time taking pictures.

Akshay Agarwal

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-213, Room 233
Cambridge, MA 02139


I am a graduate student in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. I received my Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India in 2014. During my Bachelor's I worked on calculating the electronic bandstructure of self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors. For my Master's thesis I modeled charge and energy transport in nanoscale thermoelectrics.


My current research focuses on electron diffraction and interferometry as part of the free-space quantum electron microscope project.

Reza Baghdadi

Postdoctoral Associate


Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

50 Vassar St., Room 36-231

Cambridge, MA 02139





Reza Baghdadi is a postdoctoral associate in the Research Laboratory of Electronics, at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT. He received his Ph.D. in Microtechnology and Nanoscience in 2017 from Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden. His thesis involved the design, fabrication, and characterization of planar superconductor/normal/superconductor (SNS) Josephson junctions made of YBCO/Au encapsulated nanogaps.


Reza's research interests are applied superconductivity, low-temperature physics, nanoelectronics, and nanofabrication. He is currently working on developing superconducting nanowire based devices/detectors to use them in energy-efficient, superconducting digital circuits.



Brenden Butters

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Brenden is a graduate student in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Wollongong (UOW), Australia. He received the University Medal and graduated with an honors degree in Electrical Engineering and Bachelor of Mathematics (Advanced) with Distinction (2016). His research interests include electronics, radio frequency, and high speed systems. His past work includes: lab lead on the UOW CubeSat project, hardware and software design for 3D through-the-wall radar imaging, development of high speed FPGA systems, and radio design. He is currently working on superconducting nanowire circuits.

Andrew Dane

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-241
Cambridge, MA 02139

617.254.4023—Tel / 617.253.8509—Fax / aedane@mit.edu

Andrew is currently a PhD student in MIT's Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department. He received his BS in Engineering Sciences from Harvard in 2010. His research focuses on the superconducting properties and materials which affect the performance of Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors (SNSPDs).

Hyung Wan Do

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-241
Cambridge, MA 02139

617.253.4023—Tel / 617.253.8509—Fax / hwdo@mit.edu

Hyung Wan Do is a graduate student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He received his BS in Electrical Engineering from California Institute of Technology in 2012. His research interests include nanofabrication and block copolymer self-assembly.

Ranveig Flatabø

Visiting Student
Ranveig is a PhD-student in the Department of Physics and Technology at the University of Bergen, Norway. She received her M.Sc in Nanoscience from the University of Bergen in 2014. Her research is focused on the development of nanostructured optical elements for light and matter waves using lithography methods. At MIT her work involves nanofabrication using scanning-helium ion lithography.

Ignacio Estay Forno

Research Assistant
Undergrad, MIT

Ignacio is currently an undergraduate student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. His current work with the group focuses on developing and monitoring processes to fabricate large-scale SNSPD arrays and superconducting circuits.
617.254.4023—Tel / 617.253.8509—Fax / ignacioe@mit.edu

Chung-Soo Kim

Postdoctoral Associate

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Room 36-217
Cambridge, MA 02139

617.258.6552—Tel / 617.253.8509—Fax / cskim91@mit.edu

Chung-Soo Kim is a postdoctoral associate in the Research Laboratory of Electronics, at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT. He received his PhD in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering at Seoul National University in 2012. His research to date has focused on the nanoscale hybrid manufacturing process by both bottom-up (dry particle spraying) and top-down (focused ion beam) routes for the fabrication of 3D nanostructures with multimaterials.

Chung-Soo Kim is currently investigating the quantum non-demolition electron microscope in free-space.

William Putnam

Visiting Scientist

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Room 36-217
Cambridge, MA 02139

email: bputnam@mit.edu

William Putnam is a visitng scientist and former postdoctoral associate in the Research Laboratory of Electronics. He received his Ph.D. from MIT in 2015 and from 2015-16 worked as a visiting scientist for The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging (CUI) through the Universität Hamburg. His past research has involved quantum-enhanced electron microscopy, cavity-enhanced high-harmonic generation, and strong-field light-matter interactions near solid-state nanostructures. His current work in the QNN group focuses on free-electron driven light sources and electron beam waveguides.

Emily Toomey

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Room 36-215
Cambridge, MA 02139

etoomey@mit.edu/etoomey33@gmail.com

Emily is a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at MIT. She received her Sc.B. in Electrical Engineering from Brown University in 2015. Her past work includes investigating the impact of silver(I)-mediated base-pairing on the single molecule conductance of poly-cytosine dsDNA.


Her current research focuses on the development of thin-film superconducting nanoelectronics for applications such as single-flux quantum logic. In her free time she studies painting, with a focus in oils.

Marco Turchetti

Research Support Associate
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-241
Cambridge, MA 02139

Marco Turchetti is a research support associate in the Research Laboratory of Electronics, at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT. He received his B.Sc. in Engineering Physics from the Polytechnic University of Turin in 2014 and his M.Sc. in Micro and Nanotechnologies from Polytechnic University of Turin, Grenoble Institute of Technology, and École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in 2016. His current work in the QNN group focuses on the design of an electron resonant cavity as part of the quantum electron microscope project.

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Yujia Yang

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-213
Cambridge, MA 02139

617.253.4023—Tel / 617.253.8509—Fax / yangy@mit.edu

Yujia Yang is currently a graduate student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He earned his Bachelor's Degree (B.S.) in Electronic Science and Technology from Zhejiang University (China) in 2011 and joined the group in the same year.

His research interests include nanostructure fabrication and nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. His previous work involved ab initio simulation on graphene devices. Now he is working on simulation and fabrication of nanostructured field emitters with an application in coherent and intense X-ray sources.

Qing-Yuan Zhao

Post-Doc

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-279
Cambridge, MA 02139

617.253.4168—Tel / qyzhao@mit.edu

Qing-Yuan Zhao is a postdoctoral associate in the Research Laboratory of Electronics, at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT. He graduated from Nanjing University in China. During his PhD study, he visited MIT for 17 months. His previous research was on fabricating single-photon detectors using superconducting nanowires and applying these state-of-art detectors in fiber sensors and quantum communications.

Currently, he is working on utilizing superconducting nanowires to realize novel electronics, which can be used in specific areas, such as quantum computing and superconducting digital circuits.

Qing-Yuan Zhao’s Google Scholar Page

Di Zhu

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-241
Cambridge, MA 02139

617.253.4023 Tel / 617.253.8509 Fax / dizhu@mit.edu

Di Zhu is a graduate student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He received his B.Eng. in Electrical & Electronic Engineering from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. His research interest is on nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. He is currently working on superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors.

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Administrative and Technical Staff

Dorothy Fleischer

Administrative Assistant II

Mark Mondol

Assistant Director, NanoStructures Laboratory

James Daley

Research Specialist

Matthew McGlashing

Research Technician

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Former Group Members

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