• Congratulations to Dr. Lawrence Cheuk on his Assistant Professorship at Princeton University (4/12/2019)

    We wish Lawrence success and wonderful discoveries with his new research group!

  • Spin Transport in a Mott Insulator of Ultracold Fermions (12/6/2018)

    Matthew A. Nichols, Lawrence W. Cheuk, Melih Okan, Thomas R. Hartke, Enrique Mendez, T. Senthil, Ehsan Khatami, Hao Zhang, Martin W. Zwierlein
    Science, 363, 383 (2019)

    Science Perspective by Jean-Philippe Brantut, EPFL Lausanne

    MIT News Article by Helen Knight

    arXiv:1802.10018 (2018)

    Strongly correlated materials are expected to feature unconventional transport properties, where charge, spin, and heat conduction are potentially independent probes of the dynamics. In contrast to charge transport, the measurement of spin transport in such materials is highly challenging. Here we observe spin conduction and diffusion in a system of ultracold fermionic atoms that realizes the half-filled Fermi-Hubbard model. For strong interactions, spin diffusion is driven by super-exchange and doublon-hole-assisted tunneling, and strongly violates the quantum limit of charge diffusion. The technique developed in this work can be extended to finite doping, which can shed light on the complex interplay between spin and charge in the Hubbard model.

     

     

  • Observation of 2D Fermionic Mott Insulators (4/1/2016)

    Lawrence W. Cheuk, Matthew A. Nichols, Katherine R. Lawrence, Melih Okan, Hao Zhang, Martin W. Zwierlein

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 235301 (2016)arXiv:1604.00096 (2016)

    We report on the site-resolved observation of characteristic states of the two-dimensional repulsive Fermi-Hubbard model, using ultracold 40K atoms in an optical lattice. By varying the tunneling, interaction strength, and external confinement, we realize metallic, Mott-insulating, and band-insulating states. We directly measure the local moment, which quantifies the degree of on-site magnetization, as a function of temperature and chemical potential. Entropies per particle as low as 0.99(6)kB indicate that nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic correlations should be detectable using spin-sensitive imaging.