Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology RLE at MIT
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2003 May Issue 3

RLE Pursues the Optical Clock
Erich P. Ippen at the New Limits of Precision

Multidisciplinary Initiative
the DoD MURI program and RLE

Rising Stars
Oxenham and Sugiyama

Students at the Forefront
The Helen Carr Peake Research Prize

Computational Prototyping
an interview with Jacob K. White

Introducing a New Professor
Luca Daniel joins RLE

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Introducing Two New Professors
Jongyoon Han and Joel Voldman join RLE
2003 February Issue 2

This summer, RLE welcomed two of our newest faculty, Jongyoon Han and Joel Voldman. A significant contributor to RLE’s growth the past few years has been our expanding ranks of young professors. RLE has completed extensive laboratory and office renovations this month for the two new researchers. These renovations include modern optics measurement, microscopy, tissue culture, and “wet” biological research facilities.

Both Han and Voldman exemplify one of the continuing core themes of RLE research, which is the exploration of the interface of electronics and biology.

Jongyoon HanJongyoon Han was appointed Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the summer of 2002, and has a concurrent joint faculty appointment in MIT’s Biological Engineering Division. He received his PhD from Cornell University in 2001.While a graduate research assistant at Cornell, Han earned wide recognition for his pioneering work to build and test an innovative “laboratory on a chip” possessing the capability to perform DNA sequencing in minutes rather than the hours typical of conventional technology. After being graduated from Cornell, Han worked as a research scientist at Sandia National Laboratories where he studied protein microfluidic separation systems. Han’s current research interests revolve around the application of micro and nanofabrication technology to various fundamental biology problems, including the separation and analysis of biomolecules.


Joel VoldmanJoel Voldman was appointed Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the summer of 2002. He received his PhD from MIT in 2001 and then conducted postdoctoral research at MIT and Harvard Medical School before joining the MIT faculty. Voldman’s research focuses on biomedical micro-electromechanical systems, or BioMEMS, and seeks to apply microfabrication technology to understand biological systems, especially at the cellular level. His objective is to develop technologies that enhance or enable the acquisition of new information from cellular structures.Voldman’s current work builds on several disciplines, including electrical engineering, microfabrication, bioengineering, surface science, fluid mechanics, and mass transport.

 
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DEP-BASED CELL TRAPS
Voldman uses quantitative modeling to design dielectrophoresis-based (DEP) cell traps that hold cells strongly against flow.This modeling has resulted in traps that can hold living cells with 10’s of pN of force against liquid flows. One of his designs consists of four gold post electrodes arranged as an electric quadrupole.This trap can be arrayed and electrically addressed. Living cells can then be sorted by turning the trap on and off.

Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs showing DEP-based traps for living cells.

Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs showing DEP-based traps for living cells.

Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs showing DEP-based traps for living cells.

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