MIT
Quantum Nanostructures and
Nanofabrication Group

Prof. Karl K. Berggren

People

Current Group Members

Professor Karl K. Berggren

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar Street, Suite 36-219
Cambridge, MA 02139

617.324.0272—Tel / 617.253.8509—Fax / 617.253.7545—Asst
berggren@mit.edu / RLE Biography / RLE Video

Prof. Berggren is Professor of Electrical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, where he heads the Quantum Nanostructures and Nanofabrication Group. He is also Director of the Nanostructures Laboratory in the Research Laboratory of Electronics and is a core faculty member in the Microsystems Technology Laboratory (MTL). From December of 1996 to September of 2003, Prof. Berggren served as a staff member at MIT Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, Massachusetts, and from 2010 to 2011, was on sabbatical at the Technical University of Delft in the Netherlands.

His current research focuses on methods of nanofabrication, especially applied to superconductive circuits, single-photon detectors for quantum applications, and electron-optical systems. His thesis work focused on nanolithographic methods using neutral atoms.

Professor Berggren has taught several classes at MIT, including 6.02 Digital Communications, 6 .002, Circuits and Electronics, 6.009, Fundamentals of Programming, 6.728, Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics, and 6.781, Submicrometer and Nanometer Technology.

Prof. Berggren is a fellow of AAAS, fellow of IEEE and a fellow of the International Society for Nanomanufacturing. He is a Kavli fellow, and a recipient of the 2015 Paul T. Forman Team Engineering Award from the Optical Society of America. In 2016, he received a Bose Fellowship and was also a recipient of the EECS Department's Frank Quick Innovation Fellowship.

He is currently the section editor for patterning and nanofabrication of the IOP Nanotechnology journal, and also serves on the editorial board of the IOP Nano Futures journal.   He was the program chair of the 2014 Electron, Ion, Photon Beams and Nanofabrication Conference. From 2008 to 2014 he was an elected member of the board of the Applied Superconductivity Conference.

Prof. Berggren has served as a consultant to a number of industrial, academic, and government organizations, and continues an active independent consulting practice.

 

Phillip "Donnie" Keathley

Research Scientist

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Room 36-285
Cambridge, MA 02139

e-mail: pdkeat2@mit.edu

Phillip ("Donnie") Keathley received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Electrical Engineering from University of Kentucky in 2009, and his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2015. His research experience spans the areas of ultrafast optics, strong-field science, attosecond physics, nanophotonics, and plasmonics. He is currently a research scientist in the Quantum Nanostructures and Nanofabrication group at MIT where he develops optical-field-driven electronics, nanoscale free-electron light sources, and radiation-hard nanoscale vacuum-electronics. He was recently named an Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator to continue his work studying methods for petahertz processing of optical fields using nanoscale electron emitters.

Navid Abedzadeh

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-231
Cambridge, MA 02139

navid@mit.edu

Navid Abedzadeh is a graduate student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He received his B.ASc in Nanotechnology Engineering from the University of Waterloo, Canada, in 2015. His research prior to joining MIT focused on nanophotonics and the design of optically tunable plasmonic nano-gratings. Navid is currently involved in the study of the quantum electron microscope for applications in interaction-free measurements. He spends his free time taking pictures.

Akshay Agarwal

Postdoctoral Associate

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-213, Room 233
Cambridge, MA 02139

I am a graduate student in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. I received my Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India in 2014. During my Bachelor's I worked on calculating the electronic bandstructure of self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors. For my Master's thesis I modeled charge and energy transport in nanoscale thermoelectrics.

My current research focuses on electron diffraction and interferometry as part of the free-space quantum electron microscope project.

Emma Batson

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St.
Cambridge, MA 02139

emmabat@mit.edu

Emma is a graduate student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. She received her B.S. in Physics and Electrical Engineering from MIT in 2020. Prior to joining QNN, she worked on superconducting qubits and quantum sensing systems. Her current research focuses on coupling optical photons to superconducting microwave photons.

Adina Bechhofer

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St.
Cambridge, MA 02139

adinabec@mit.edu

Adina is a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at MIT. She received her B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Columbia University and her B.A. in Applied Mathematics from Queens College in 2020. Her past research includes a mix of 2D semiconductor physics and computing for social good.
She currently works with the Computational Prototyping Group and the QNN on modeling planar nano vacuum transistors. Her work is supported by an NSF GRFP grant.

Mina Bionta

Postdoctoral Associate

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Room 36-227
Cambridge, MA 02139

e-mail: mbionta@mit.edu

Mina’s research focuses on the interaction between an ultrafast laser pulse and a sample (nanodevices, gases, complex material, etc.), using this interaction to understand more about the sample, the laser pulse, or the interaction itself. Originally hailing from Livermore, CA, Mina received her B.S. in physics from Stanford University with a minor in French literature. Afterwards she was a Research Associate at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) in Menlo Park, CA where she developed the time tool to measure the relative arrival time between an x-ray pulse from and an optical laser. She then did her PhD in physics at the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, France where she studied ultrafast electron emission from sharp metallic nanotips. Her postdoctoral research at the Institute National de la Recherche Scientifique - Centre Énergie Matériaux et Télécommunications (INRS-EMT) in Varennes, Québec examined the insulator to metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide. Currently she is studying optical field effects on nanostructured devices. In her spare time Mina enjoys cooking, running, and traveling.

Brenden Butters

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-279
Cambridge, MA 02139

butters@mit.edu

Brenden is a graduate student in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Wollongong (UOW), Australia. He received the University Medal and graduated with an honors degree in Electrical Engineering and Bachelor of Mathematics (Advanced) with Distinction (2016). His research interests include electronics, radio frequency, and high speed systems. His past work includes: lab lead on the UOW CubeSat project, hardware and software design for 3D through-the-wall radar imaging, development of high speed FPGA systems, and radio design. He is currently working on superconducting nanowire circuits.

Ilya Charaev

Postdoctoral Associate

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Room 36-227
Cambridge, MA 02139

e-mail: charaev@mit.edu
Tel / 617.253.0237

Ilya Charaev is a postdoctoral associate in the Research Laboratory of Electronics, at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT. Ilya did the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Information Technology in Dec. 2017 at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany.
His PhD work presents a comprehensive investigation of the influence of geometry-dependent factors on performance metrics of superconducting single-photon detectors (SuperconductingNanowire Single-Photon Detector, SNSPD).
The current research focuses on the materials, design for SNSPDs and detection mechanism in superconducting nanowires.

Marco Colangelo

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-217
Cambridge, MA 02139

colang@mit.edu

Marco is a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at MIT. He received his M.Sc. degree in Micro and Nanotechnologies from the Polytechnic University of Turin, Grenoble Institute of Technology, and École Polytechnique Fédérale in 2017, and his B.Sc. in Engineering Physics from the Polytechnic University of Turin in 2015.
His current work is focused on the development of new readout techniques for superconducting nanowire single photon detectors.

Mackenzie LeVangie

Lab Manager

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Room 36-229
Cambridge, MA 02139

e-mail: levangie@mit.edu

Mackenzie is a lab manager with RLE’s Quantum Nanostructures and Nanofabrication group. She received her Bachelor’s in Physics from Northeastern University in 2020. She has prior experience in quantum communication research and in the research and development of eddy current NDT technology. In her free time she enjoys painting, singing, and walking in nature.

Owen Medeiros

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-283
Cambridge, MA 02139

Email: omedeiro@mit.edu
Tel: 6172589250

Owen is a Graduate student in the Research Laboratory of Electronics, at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT. He received his BS in Electromechanical Engineering from Wentworth Institute of Technology in 2019. His current work is focused on superconducting nanowires and large area single photon detectors. He likes to spend his free time kayaking or snowboarding.

John William Simonaitis

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-241
Cambridge, MA 02139

johnsimo@mit.edu

John is currently a Ph.D. student in Electrical Engineering at MIT. In 2018, he received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering with a minor in Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In the past he has done work with spray and blade-coated perovskite solar cells, plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy for GaN growth, fabricating block copolymer nanostructures, oncology, and on novel AFM sensing modes. His current work is with the quantum electron microscope project, and in his free time he enjoys hiking, running, and sailing.

Marco Turchetti

Research Assistant
PhD Student, EECS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Suite 36-231
Cambridge, MA 02139

turchett@mit.edu

Marco is a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at MIT. He received a B.Sc. in Engineering Physics from the Polytechnic University of Turin in 2014, a M.Sc. in Micro and Nanotechnologies from Polytechnic University of Turin, Grenoble Institute of Technology, and École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in 2016 and a M.Sc. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2019. His current work in the QNN group focuses on the development of planar nano vacuum transistors and PHz processing of optical fields.

Tony Zhou

Postdoctoral Associate

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
50 Vassar St., Room 36-227
Cambridge, MA 02139

e-mail: zhou01@mit.edu

Tony is a postdoctoral associate in the Research Laboratory of Electronics, at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Tony completed a B.S. in Engineering Physics at University of Colorado at Boulder, a PhD. in Applied Physics at Harvard. In his PhD, he worked on discovery of condensed matter physics by using an atomic sensor in diamond as a magnetometer probe.
His current research focuses on all aspects for SNSPDs.

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Administrative and Technical Staff

Dorothy Fleischer

Administrative Assistant II

Mark Mondol

Assistant Director, NanoStructures Laboratory

James Daley

Research Specialist

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Former Group Members

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